(via APOD: 2011 October 24 - HH 222: The Waterfall Nebula)
Once again, the Orion Molecular Cloud gives us an amazing structure in the sky. In this case, the Waterfall Nebula (HH-222) in NGC 1999.
And, to pique our curiosity a litte more, no one is sure how this structure came about. There’s the possibility that a young star’s strong stellar winds are impacting the molecular cloud, but that wouldn’t account for the filaments seeming to converge on a source of strong radio signals in the upper curve. It could be a binary with a white dwarf/neutron star/black hole, but there’s no strong x-ray emissions.
For now it’s a mystery, which segues nicely to one of my thoughts upon seeing it: it seems we cannot escape Reichenbach.
Image Credit: Z. Levay (STScI/AURA/NASA), T.A. Rector (U. Alaska Anchorage) & H. Schweiker (NOAO/AURA/NSF), KPNO, NOAO

(via APOD: 2011 October 24 - HH 222: The Waterfall Nebula)

Once again, the Orion Molecular Cloud gives us an amazing structure in the sky. In this case, the Waterfall Nebula (HH-222) in NGC 1999.

And, to pique our curiosity a litte more, no one is sure how this structure came about. There’s the possibility that a young star’s strong stellar winds are impacting the molecular cloud, but that wouldn’t account for the filaments seeming to converge on a source of strong radio signals in the upper curve. It could be a binary with a white dwarf/neutron star/black hole, but there’s no strong x-ray emissions.

For now it’s a mystery, which segues nicely to one of my thoughts upon seeing it: it seems we cannot escape Reichenbach.

Image Credit: Z. Levay (STScI/AURA/NASA), T.A. Rector (U. Alaska Anchorage) & H. Schweiker (NOAO/AURA/NSF), KPNONOAO

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