(via APOD: 2012 January 15 - Infrared Portrait of the Large Magellanic Cloud)
Holy wow! The Large Magellanic Cloud as you’ve likely never seen it before.
Spitzer’s infrared data is in blue, showing warmed dust where star formation is more current. Herschel catches cooler wavelengths of IR, in red and green, showing where the dust hasn’t become warm enough to start stars forming or the dust has been scattered by already formed stars and the formation activity has stopped.
Interestingly, as the APOD editor points out, this looks much different from the visual version of the cloud, but you can see the Tarantula Nebula just to the left of center.

(via APOD: 2012 January 15 - Infrared Portrait of the Large Magellanic Cloud)

Holy wow! The Large Magellanic Cloud as you’ve likely never seen it before.

Spitzer’s infrared data is in blue, showing warmed dust where star formation is more current. Herschel catches cooler wavelengths of IR, in red and green, showing where the dust hasn’t become warm enough to start stars forming or the dust has been scattered by already formed stars and the formation activity has stopped.

Interestingly, as the APOD editor points out, this looks much different from the visual version of the cloud, but you can see the Tarantula Nebula just to the left of center.

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