In which I take “this person” as a term of endearment…

subtlefire replied to your photo: nook color running honeycomb on Flickr. Via…

Oooooooh! *flail* You may have just solved my Nook/Kindle dilemma! Of course, I need to look into this person’s definition of “ridiculously easy” first.

…and offer some level of expertise/judgement/what-have-you on the e-reader front.

For reference, here’s a nice walk-through:

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/hiner/how-to-hack-the-250-nook-color-into-a-full-android-tablet/7630

Here’s a video-based thing (which I haven’t watched because I generally get annoyed with how-to videos, but some people prefer them):

http://theunlockr.com/2011/02/07/how-to-load-honeycomb-android-3-0-on-the-nook-color-usd-method/

The nook isn’t mine, but, at work, we own a Kindle 1, Kindle 2, nook, nook color, and iPad, all for testing things on. My boss is fairly tech savvy, but she doesn’t generally go around “root-ing” her devices, so the fact that she could turn the nook color into an Android tablet just by tweaking a fairly inexpensive microSD card was appealing to her. I took a shot of the Android Honeycomb (3.0) OS running on the device. Honeycomb is tablet-optimized (for the Motorola Xoom, largely) version, but you can also run the phone-based Android OSes as well (Gingerbread and Froyo).

I generally still prefer something like my Sony Reader Touch because it is smaller, lighter and still eInk, but while I may like reading graphic novels in grayscale just fine, others might prefer theirs in color.

Also, a final vote for the nook in the Kindle/nook debate, the nook can read Adobe Digital Editions books (they can be side-loaded), and, if you use the Android/microSD hack, you can also borrow library ADE books via the OverDrive app for Android.

  1. sirperceval said: Since you probably missed the ask I sent: Noticed right after posting that the photo was yours. Duh. I like that the B&W ones are lighter but hnnnnnng Android hack. I am so bad at making decisions.
  2. angwe posted this