(via BiblioVault - And Bid Him Sing: A Biography of Countée Cullen)
"Your grief and mine /
Must intertwine”
- “Any Human Being to Another” by Countée Cullen
Book Description:

While competing with Langston Hughes for the title of “Poet Laureate of Harlem,” Countée Cullen (1903–46) crafted poems that became touchstones for American readers, both black and white. Inspired by classic themes and working within traditional forms, Cullen shaped his poetry to address universal questions like love, death, longing, and loss while also dealing with the issues of race and idealism that permeated the national conversation. Drawing on the poet’s unpublished correspondence with contemporaries and friends like Hughes, Claude McKay, Carl Van Vechten, Dorothy West, Charles S. Johnson and Alain Locke, and presenting a unique interpretation of his poetic gifts, And Bid Him Sing is the first full-length critical biography of this famous American writer.
 
Despite his untimely death at the age of forty-two, Cullen left behind an extensive body of work. In addition to five books of poetry, he authored two much-loved children’s books and translated Euripides’ Medea, the first translation by an African American of a Greek tragedy. In these pages, Charles Molesworth explores the many ways that race, religion, and Cullen’s sexuality informed the work of one of the unquestioned stars of the Harlem Renaissance.
 
An authoritative work of biography that brings to life one of the chief voices of his generation, And Bid Him Sing returns to us one of America’s finest lyric poets in all of his complexity and musicality.

(via BiblioVault - And Bid Him Sing: A Biography of Countée Cullen)

"Your grief and mine /

Must intertwine”

- “Any Human Being to Another” by Countée Cullen

Book Description:

While competing with Langston Hughes for the title of “Poet Laureate of Harlem,” Countée Cullen (1903–46) crafted poems that became touchstones for American readers, both black and white. Inspired by classic themes and working within traditional forms, Cullen shaped his poetry to address universal questions like love, death, longing, and loss while also dealing with the issues of race and idealism that permeated the national conversation. Drawing on the poet’s unpublished correspondence with contemporaries and friends like Hughes, Claude McKay, Carl Van Vechten, Dorothy West, Charles S. Johnson and Alain Locke, and presenting a unique interpretation of his poetic gifts, And Bid Him Sing is the first full-length critical biography of this famous American writer.
 
Despite his untimely death at the age of forty-two, Cullen left behind an extensive body of work. In addition to five books of poetry, he authored two much-loved children’s books and translated Euripides’ Medea, the first translation by an African American of a Greek tragedy. In these pages, Charles Molesworth explores the many ways that race, religion, and Cullen’s sexuality informed the work of one of the unquestioned stars of the Harlem Renaissance.
 
An authoritative work of biography that brings to life one of the chief voices of his generation, And Bid Him Sing returns to us one of America’s finest lyric poets in all of his complexity and musicality.
(via BiblioVault - Race Resistance and the Boy Scout Movement In British Colonial Africa: In British Colonial Africa)

Conceived by General Sir Robert Baden-Powell as a way to reduce class tensions in Edwardian Britain, scouting evolved into an international youth movement. It offered a vision of romantic outdoor life as a cure for disruption caused by industrialization and urbanization. Scouting’s global spread was due to its success in attaching itself to institutions of authority. As a result, scouting has become embroiled in controversies in the civil rights struggle in the American South, in nationalist resistance movements in India, and in the contemporary American debate over gay rights. In Race, Resistance, and the Boy Scout Movement in British Colonial Africa, Timothy Parsons uses scouting as an analytical tool to explore the tensions in colonial society. Introduced by British officials to strengthen their rule, the movement targeted the students, juvenile delinquents, and urban migrants who threatened the social stability of the regime. Yet Africans themselves used scouting to claim the rights of full imperial citizenship. They invoked the Fourth Scout Law, which declared that a scout was a brother to every other scout, to challenge racial discrimination. Parsons shows that African scouting was both an instrument of colonial authority and a subversive challenge to the legitimacy of the British Empire. His study of African scouting demonstrates the implications and far-reaching consequences of colonial authority in all its guises.

 Oh, FS!

(via BiblioVault - Race Resistance and the Boy Scout Movement In British Colonial Africa: In British Colonial Africa)

Conceived by General Sir Robert Baden-Powell as a way to reduce class tensions in Edwardian Britain, scouting evolved into an international youth movement. It offered a vision of romantic outdoor life as a cure for disruption caused by industrialization and urbanization. Scouting’s global spread was due to its success in attaching itself to institutions of authority. As a result, scouting has become embroiled in controversies in the civil rights struggle in the American South, in nationalist resistance movements in India, and in the contemporary American debate over gay rights.

In Race, Resistance, and the Boy Scout Movement in British Colonial Africa, Timothy Parsons uses scouting as an analytical tool to explore the tensions in colonial society. Introduced by British officials to strengthen their rule, the movement targeted the students, juvenile delinquents, and urban migrants who threatened the social stability of the regime. Yet Africans themselves used scouting to claim the rights of full imperial citizenship. They invoked the Fourth Scout Law, which declared that a scout was a brother to every other scout, to challenge racial discrimination.

Parsons shows that African scouting was both an instrument of colonial authority and a subversive challenge to the legitimacy of the British Empire. His study of African scouting demonstrates the implications and far-reaching consequences of colonial authority in all its guises.

 Oh, FS!

(via BiblioVault - Odd Tribes: Toward a Cultural Analysis of White People)
Interesting. Take a bunch of relevant race theory, which has been historically used to examine how race intersects with ideas of gender, class, and society, turn it on one of the oft-delineated subgroups of white society, “white trash”, and see if there is some understanding to be gained about ideas of whiteness and their relationship with other identity factors. Throw in a dash of analyzing popular reactions to and reclamations of the stereotype, and you have a very interesting cultural study on your hands.

(via BiblioVault - Odd Tribes: Toward a Cultural Analysis of White People)

Interesting. Take a bunch of relevant race theory, which has been historically used to examine how race intersects with ideas of gender, class, and society, turn it on one of the oft-delineated subgroups of white society, “white trash”, and see if there is some understanding to be gained about ideas of whiteness and their relationship with other identity factors. Throw in a dash of analyzing popular reactions to and reclamations of the stereotype, and you have a very interesting cultural study on your hands.

(via BiblioVault - Classical Spies: American Archaeologists with the OSS in World War II Greece)
Indiana Jones for true, though!

Classical Spies is the first insiders’ account  of the operations of the American intelligence service in World War II  Greece. Initiated by archaeologists in Greece and the eastern  Mediterranean, the network drew on scholars’ personal contacts and  knowledge of languages and terrain. While modern readers might think  Indiana Jones is just a fantasy character, Classical Spies disclosesevents  where even Indy would feel at home: burying Athenian dig records in an  Egyptian tomb, activating prep-school connections to establish spies  code-named Vulture and Chickadee, and organizing parachute drops.

FS will love this one. As will, I’m sure, all my historian followers. Oh, hell, I bet this has something for everyone.

(via BiblioVault - Classical Spies: American Archaeologists with the OSS in World War II Greece)

Indiana Jones for true, though!

Classical Spies is the first insiders’ account of the operations of the American intelligence service in World War II Greece. Initiated by archaeologists in Greece and the eastern Mediterranean, the network drew on scholars’ personal contacts and knowledge of languages and terrain. While modern readers might think Indiana Jones is just a fantasy character, Classical Spies disclosesevents where even Indy would feel at home: burying Athenian dig records in an Egyptian tomb, activating prep-school connections to establish spies code-named Vulture and Chickadee, and organizing parachute drops.

FS will love this one. As will, I’m sure, all my historian followers. Oh, hell, I bet this has something for everyone.

(via BiblioVault - Georgia Civil War Manuscript Collections: An Annotated Bibliography
An unassuming little book, but this annotated bibliography will tell you which institutions in Georgia house which archives of what materials related to the Civil War era, and, additionally, longer-term archive material related to prominent figures of the Civil War. (That is, you won’t just find Robert E. Lee’s wartime diaries and letter that exist anywhere in Georgia, but also anything of his from before and after the war that exist in Georgia…probably not a good example as he was a Virginia commander, but bear with me.)
Anywho, a resource for the Civil War folks.
)

(via BiblioVault - Georgia Civil War Manuscript Collections: An Annotated Bibliography

An unassuming little book, but this annotated bibliography will tell you which institutions in Georgia house which archives of what materials related to the Civil War era, and, additionally, longer-term archive material related to prominent figures of the Civil War. (That is, you won’t just find Robert E. Lee’s wartime diaries and letter that exist anywhere in Georgia, but also anything of his from before and after the war that exist in Georgia…probably not a good example as he was a Virginia commander, but bear with me.)

Anywho, a resource for the Civil War folks.

)

(via BiblioVault - Cake: A Global History)
Dear Cakesexual Aces,
I have found your historical pr0n:

Be it a birthday or a wedding—let them eat cake. Encased in icing, crowned with candles, emblazoned with congratulatory words—cake is the ultimate food of celebration in many cultures around the world. But how did cake come to be the essential food marker of a significant occasion? In Cake: A Global History, Nicola Humble explores the meanings, legends, rituals, and symbolism attached to cake through the ages.
            Humble describes the many national differences in cake-making techniques, customs, and regional histories—from the French gâteau Paris-Brest, named for a cycle race and designed to imitate the form of a bicycle wheel, to the American Lady Baltimore cake, likely named for a fictional cake in a 1906 novel by Owen Wister. She also details the role of cake in literature, art, and film—including Miss Havisham’s imperishable wedding cake in Great Expectations and Marcel Proust’s madeleine of memory—as well as the art and architecture of cake making itself.
Featuring a large selection of mouthwatering images, as well as many examples and recipes for some particularly unusual cakes, Cake will provide many sweet reasons for celebration.

Love,
Minion

(via BiblioVault - Cake: A Global History)

Dear Cakesexual Aces,

I have found your historical pr0n:

Be it a birthday or a wedding—let them eat cake. Encased in icing, crowned with candles, emblazoned with congratulatory words—cake is the ultimate food of celebration in many cultures around the world. But how did cake come to be the essential food marker of a significant occasion? In Cake: A Global History, Nicola Humble explores the meanings, legends, rituals, and symbolism attached to cake through the ages.

            Humble describes the many national differences in cake-making techniques, customs, and regional histories—from the French gâteau Paris-Brest, named for a cycle race and designed to imitate the form of a bicycle wheel, to the American Lady Baltimore cake, likely named for a fictional cake in a 1906 novel by Owen Wister. She also details the role of cake in literature, art, and film—including Miss Havisham’s imperishable wedding cake in Great Expectations and Marcel Proust’s madeleine of memory—as well as the art and architecture of cake making itself.

Featuring a large selection of mouthwatering images, as well as many examples and recipes for some particularly unusual cakes, Cake will provide many sweet reasons for celebration.

Love,

Minion

(via BiblioVault - Time Travel and Warp Drives: A Scientific Guide to Shortcuts through Time and Space)
Sci-fi makes it look so easy. Receive a distress call  from Alpha  Centauri? No problem: punch the warp drive and you’re there  in minutes.  Facing a catastrophe that can’t be averted? Just pop back  in the  timestream and stop it before it starts. But for those of us not  lucky  enough to live in a science-fictional universe, are these ideas  merely  flights of fancy—or could it really be possible to travel  through time  or take shortcuts between stars?Cutting-edge physics may not be able to answer those questions yet, but it does offer up some tantalizing possibilities. In Time Travel and Warp Drives,   Allen Everett and Thomas A. Roman take readers on a clear, concise  tour  of our current understanding of the nature of time and space—and   whether or not we might be able to bend them to our will. Using no math   beyond high school algebra, the authors lay out an approachable   explanation of Einstein’s special relativity, then move through the   fundamental differences between traveling forward and backward in time   and the surprising theoretical connection between going back in time and   traveling faster than the speed of light. They survey a variety of   possible time machines and warp drives, including wormholes and warp   bubbles, and, in a dizzyingly creative chapter, imagine the paradoxes   that could plague a world where time travel was possible—killing your   own grandfather is only one of them!
You get one guess as to whether this is on my Christmas bonus list…

(via BiblioVault - Time Travel and Warp Drives: A Scientific Guide to Shortcuts through Time and Space)

Sci-fi makes it look so easy. Receive a distress call from Alpha Centauri? No problem: punch the warp drive and you’re there in minutes. Facing a catastrophe that can’t be averted? Just pop back in the timestream and stop it before it starts. But for those of us not lucky enough to live in a science-fictional universe, are these ideas merely flights of fancy—or could it really be possible to travel through time or take shortcuts between stars?

Cutting-edge physics may not be able to answer those questions yet, but it does offer up some tantalizing possibilities. In Time Travel and Warp Drives, Allen Everett and Thomas A. Roman take readers on a clear, concise tour of our current understanding of the nature of time and space—and whether or not we might be able to bend them to our will. Using no math beyond high school algebra, the authors lay out an approachable explanation of Einstein’s special relativity, then move through the fundamental differences between traveling forward and backward in time and the surprising theoretical connection between going back in time and traveling faster than the speed of light. They survey a variety of possible time machines and warp drives, including wormholes and warp bubbles, and, in a dizzyingly creative chapter, imagine the paradoxes that could plague a world where time travel was possible—killing your own grandfather is only one of them!

You get one guess as to whether this is on my Christmas bonus list…

Demons of the Night is a trove of haunting fiction—a gathering, for the first time in English, of the best nineteenth-century French fantastic tales. Featuring such authors as Balzac, Mérimée, Dumas, Verne, and Maupassant, this book offers readers familiar with the works of Edgar Allan Poe and E. T. A. Hoffman some of the most memorable stories in the genre. With its aura of the uncanny and the supernatural, the fantastic tale is a vehicle for exploring forbidden themes and the dark, irrational side of the human psyche.

Looks like it could be an interesting companion to any study of American and British literature of the same period.

(via BiblioVault - The Commodity Culture of Victorian England: Advertising and Spectacle, 1851-1914)
Table of Contents Introduction1. The Great Exhibition of Things2. The Image of Victoria in the Year of Jubilee3. Selling Darkest Africa4. The Patent Medicine System5. Those Lovely Seaside Girls Conclusion Notes Index

Looks very interesting, no?

(via BiblioVault - The Commodity Culture of Victorian England: Advertising and Spectacle, 1851-1914)

Table of Contents

Introduction

1. The Great Exhibition of Things

2. The Image of Victoria in the Year of Jubilee

3. Selling Darkest Africa

4. The Patent Medicine System

5. Those Lovely Seaside Girls

Conclusion

Notes

Index

Looks very interesting, no?