(via South Pole Telescope homes in on dark energy, neutrinos | UChicago News)

“With the full SPT data set, we will be able to place extremely tight constraints on dark energy and possibly determine the mass of the neutrinos,” said Bradford Benson, a postdoctoral scientist at the University of Chicago’s Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics. Benson presented the SPT collaboration’s latest findings on April 1 at the American Physical Society meeting in Atlanta.


(This image displays a portion of the South Pole Telescope survey of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the light left over from the big bang. The variations in the image are tiny fluctuations in the intensity of the CMB, caused by differences in the distribution of matter in the early universe at a time only 400,000 years after the big bang. The image is effectively a “baby” picture of the universe.
Courtesy of SPT Collaboration)

(via South Pole Telescope homes in on dark energy, neutrinos | UChicago News)

“With the full SPT data set, we will be able to place extremely tight constraints on dark energy and possibly determine the mass of the neutrinos,” said Bradford Benson, a postdoctoral scientist at the University of Chicago’s Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics. Benson presented the SPT collaboration’s latest findings on April 1 at the American Physical Society meeting in Atlanta.

(This image displays a portion of the South Pole Telescope survey of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the light left over from the big bang. The variations in the image are tiny fluctuations in the intensity of the CMB, caused by differences in the distribution of matter in the early universe at a time only 400,000 years after the big bang. The image is effectively a “baby” picture of the universe.

Courtesy of SPT Collaboration)