(via BiblioVault - A Woman’s Civil War: A Diary with Reminiscences of the War, from March 1862)
“On the night of March 11, 1862, as the heavy tramp of  Confederate marching troops died away in the distance—her husband’s  regiment among them—Cornelia Peake McDonald began her diary of events in  war-torn Winchester, Virginia.”
For the history folks in the crowd.

(via BiblioVault - A Woman’s Civil War: A Diary with Reminiscences of the War, from March 1862)

On the night of March 11, 1862, as the heavy tramp of Confederate marching troops died away in the distance—her husband’s regiment among them—Cornelia Peake McDonald began her diary of events in war-torn Winchester, Virginia.”

For the history folks in the crowd.

(via BiblioVault - Georgia Civil War Manuscript Collections: An Annotated Bibliography
An unassuming little book, but this annotated bibliography will tell you which institutions in Georgia house which archives of what materials related to the Civil War era, and, additionally, longer-term archive material related to prominent figures of the Civil War. (That is, you won’t just find Robert E. Lee’s wartime diaries and letter that exist anywhere in Georgia, but also anything of his from before and after the war that exist in Georgia…probably not a good example as he was a Virginia commander, but bear with me.)
Anywho, a resource for the Civil War folks.
)

(via BiblioVault - Georgia Civil War Manuscript Collections: An Annotated Bibliography

An unassuming little book, but this annotated bibliography will tell you which institutions in Georgia house which archives of what materials related to the Civil War era, and, additionally, longer-term archive material related to prominent figures of the Civil War. (That is, you won’t just find Robert E. Lee’s wartime diaries and letter that exist anywhere in Georgia, but also anything of his from before and after the war that exist in Georgia…probably not a good example as he was a Virginia commander, but bear with me.)

Anywho, a resource for the Civil War folks.

)

(via BiblioVault - The Captain Departs: Ulysses S. Grant’s Last Campaign)

Early in 1885 Americans learned that General Grant was writing his Memoirs in a desperate race for time against an incurable cancer. Not generally known was the General’s precarious personal fi­nances, made so by imprudent invest­ments, and his gallant effort to provide for his family by his writing. For six months newspaper readers followed the dramatic contest, and the hearts of Americans were touched by the General’s last battle.

(via BiblioVault - The Captain Departs: Ulysses S. Grant’s Last Campaign)

Early in 1885 Americans learned that General Grant was writing his Memoirs in a desperate race for time against an incurable cancer. Not generally known was the General’s precarious personal fi­nances, made so by imprudent invest­ments, and his gallant effort to provide for his family by his writing. For six months newspaper readers followed the dramatic contest, and the hearts of Americans were touched by the General’s last battle.

Blood and anger, bragging and pain, are all part of this young Iowa soldier’s vigorous words about war and soldiering. A twenty-year-old farmer from Council Bluffs, Charles O. Musser was one of the 76,000 Iowans who enlisted to wear the blue uniform. He was a prolific writer, penning at least 130 letters home during his term of service with the 29th Iowa Volunteer Infantry.

Soldier Boy makes a significant contribution to the literature of the common soldier in the Civil War. Moreover, it takes a rare look at the Trans-Mississippi theater, which has traditionally been undervalued by historians.

Always Musser dutifully wrote and mailed his letters home. With a commendable eye for historical detail, he told of battles and marches, guerrilla and siege warfare, camp life and garrison soldiering, morale and patriotism, Copperheads and contraband, and Lincoln’s reelection and assassination, creating a remarkable account of activities in this almost forgotten backwater of the war.

John Dooley was the youngest son of Irish immigrants to Richmond, Virginia, where his father prospered, and the family took a leading position among Richmond’s sizeable Irish community. Early in 1862, John left his studies at Georgetown University to serve in the First Virginia Infantry Regiment, in which his father John and brother James also served. John’s service took him to Second Manassas, South Mountain, Sharpsburg (Antietam), Fredericksburg, and Gettysburg; before that last battle, Dooley was elected a lieutenant. On the third day at Gettysburg, Dooley swept up the hill in Pickett’s charge, where he was shot through both legs and lay all night on the field, to be made a POW the next day. Held until February 27, 1865, Dooley made his way back south to arrive home very near the Confederacy’s final collapse.

(via BiblioVault - A Wisconsin Boy in Dixie: Civil War Letters of James K. Newton)
Be prepared for book-spam today people.
Apparently enough people have bought copies of some very interesting titles, so they are all getting new short-run prints at our digital print center.
This one is especially for visionplace, but also for anyone interested in Civil War era primary source documentation.

(via BiblioVault - A Wisconsin Boy in Dixie: Civil War Letters of James K. Newton)

Be prepared for book-spam today people.

Apparently enough people have bought copies of some very interesting titles, so they are all getting new short-run prints at our digital print center.

This one is especially for visionplace, but also for anyone interested in Civil War era primary source documentation.