(via APOD: 2013 May 14 - Galaxy Collisions: Simulation vs Observations)

Images Credit: NASAESAVisualization: Frank Summers (STScI); Simulation: Chris Mihos (CWRU) & Lars Hernquist (Harvard).

Intersperse computer simulation of a galaxy collision with actual Hubble images of galaxies mid-collision and you get the feeling we know, pretty well, what happens when galaxies collide.

This is important because it means we’ve got a good handle on the larger-structure evolution of the universe at the galaxy level. We need to be sure of this if we’re going to do thought experiments, make theories, and test with observations into the ancient universe what it should look like in the past.

(via APOD: 2013 February 6)
The Arms of M106
Credit: Image Data - Hubble Legacy Archive, Robert Gendler, Jay Gabany, Processing - Robert Gendler
Two massive jets of hydrogen gas spiral “wrong” in relation to the motion of the rest M106’s spiral arms. The others show typical dust lanes, blue star cluster, pink star forming regions, and a central yellow area with older stars. The two tendrils spinning up and down are being blown out by the energy jets coming from the galaxy’s central supermassive black hole.

(via APOD: 2013 February 6)

The Arms of M106

Credit: Image Data - Hubble Legacy Archive, Robert Gendler, Jay Gabany, Processing - Robert Gendler

Two massive jets of hydrogen gas spiral “wrong” in relation to the motion of the rest M106’s spiral arms. The others show typical dust lanes, blue star cluster, pink star forming regions, and a central yellow area with older stars. The two tendrils spinning up and down are being blown out by the energy jets coming from the galaxy’s central supermassive black hole.

(via APOD: 2013 February 3)
LL Ori and the Orion Nebula
Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team
LL Orionis is a variable star (hence the “LL” designation) in the Orion nebula. It is a young star, with a more powerful solar wind than the Sun, and the shockwave at the front is due to it’s motion against the gas flowing slowly away from the hot central Trapezium cluster of stars.
Pretty much the entire Orion Nebula is full of these flows, shockwaves, and strange, fluid shapes. You can see it too! Well, OK, you can see it as a rather pink star in the scabbard stars hanging from Orion’s belt. You’ll need a good telescope to see the actual nebulosity of it.

(via APOD: 2013 February 3)

LL Ori and the Orion Nebula

Image Credit: NASAESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team

LL Orionis is a variable star (hence the “LL” designation) in the Orion nebula. It is a young star, with a more powerful solar wind than the Sun, and the shockwave at the front is due to it’s motion against the gas flowing slowly away from the hot central Trapezium cluster of stars.

Pretty much the entire Orion Nebula is full of these flows, shockwaves, and strange, fluid shapes. You can see it too! Well, OK, you can see it as a rather pink star in the scabbard stars hanging from Orion’s belt. You’ll need a good telescope to see the actual nebulosity of it.

(via APOD: 2012 October 24 - NGC 206 and the Star Clouds of Andromeda)
NGC 206 is the star cluster in the center of the image. See those bright blue stars all clumped together? Yeah, that’s an open cluster (or galactic cluster) like the Pleiades or the stars in the Eagle Nebula…except a whole lot bigger. There’s nothing in our own galaxy to compare it to. At 4,000 light-years across, NGC 206 is comparable to the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud or NGC 604 in M33, the Triangulum Galaxy.

Tarantula Nebula, John P. Gleason

NGC 604, from Hubble Heritage
Stellar nurseries are amaaaaaaaazing.

(via APOD: 2012 October 24 - NGC 206 and the Star Clouds of Andromeda)

NGC 206 is the star cluster in the center of the image. See those bright blue stars all clumped together? Yeah, that’s an open cluster (or galactic cluster) like the Pleiades or the stars in the Eagle Nebula…except a whole lot bigger. There’s nothing in our own galaxy to compare it to. At 4,000 light-years across, NGC 206 is comparable to the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud or NGC 604 in M33, the Triangulum Galaxy.

Tarantula NebulaJohn P. Gleason

NGC 604, from Hubble Heritage

Stellar nurseries are amaaaaaaaazing.

(via APOD: 2012 November 8 - Arp 188 and the Tadpole’s Tail)
Image Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA; Processing - Bill Snyder (Heavens Mirror Observatory)
420 million light-years away, looking out in the direction of Draco, you can see this cosmic tadpole with a tail of star formation and a head made from a warped galaxy. Arp 188, the main focus of this image, had a gravitational encounter with the galaxy you can see slightly through it, in the upper-right spiral arms, another galaxy about 300,000 light-years behind Arp 188. Though seemingly far a way, that’s more than close enough for gravitational encounters, given that the Milky Way is 100,000 light-years across.

(via APOD: 2012 November 8 - Arp 188 and the Tadpole’s Tail)

Image Credit: Hubble Legacy ArchiveESANASAProcessing Bill Snyder (Heavens Mirror Observatory)

420 million light-years away, looking out in the direction of Draco, you can see this cosmic tadpole with a tail of star formation and a head made from a warped galaxy. Arp 188, the main focus of this image, had a gravitational encounter with the galaxy you can see slightly through it, in the upper-right spiral arms, another galaxy about 300,000 light-years behind Arp 188. Though seemingly far a way, that’s more than close enough for gravitational encounters, given that the Milky Way is 100,000 light-years across.

nearfuturedesign

nearfuturedesign:

Galaxy Spiral Rose (NGC 1073)

$15, by Near-Future Design on Etsy

This unique origami spiral rose has been created from a picture of NGC 1073, a barred spiral galaxy, as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope.

Show off your love of space and the stars!

The rose has been protected and hardened with glaze (water-resistant, but not water-proof, it is paper after all) and decorated with black glitter to make it really shine.

With a pin-back setting, this piece can be a brooch, a pin, or a fascinator for hat or headband.


Have any questions? Contact the shop owner.

(via APOD: 2012 October 6 - At the Heart of Orion)
At the Heart of Orion Credit: Image Data - Hubble Legacy Archive, Processing - Robert Gendler
I’ve come to love the fact that we’ll never quite get done parsing all of the Hubble data. We’ll always encounter people who are processing it in a slightly different way the provides new and interesting visuals.
This is the Trapezium cluster of stars in the heart of the Orion Nebula. They are very young (3 million years old), very hot, and very massive. Most of the visual glow you see in this image (you’ll note that the reflection aspect of the nebula is yellow, not the usual blue, because there is just so much light and radiation) comes from just those four stars. Now there’s a harsh ultraviolet environment for you.
Additionally, it would seem that the prior conditions of the nebula, smaller and more compact, created some runaway stellar collisions (massive stars being born very close to each other, falling into gravitational entanglement, keep merging and gravitationally attracting more of their massive neighbors) have created a hundred-solar-mass black hole. The Trapezium stars move quite fast, so this would explain their motion.
It would also put a black hole about 1500 light-years from us, the closest one known.

(via APOD: 2012 October 6 - At the Heart of Orion)

At the Heart of Orion 
Credit: Image Data - Hubble Legacy ArchiveProcessing - Robert Gendler

I’ve come to love the fact that we’ll never quite get done parsing all of the Hubble data. We’ll always encounter people who are processing it in a slightly different way the provides new and interesting visuals.

This is the Trapezium cluster of stars in the heart of the Orion Nebula. They are very young (3 million years old), very hot, and very massive. Most of the visual glow you see in this image (you’ll note that the reflection aspect of the nebula is yellow, not the usual blue, because there is just so much light and radiation) comes from just those four stars. Now there’s a harsh ultraviolet environment for you.

Additionally, it would seem that the prior conditions of the nebula, smaller and more compact, created some runaway stellar collisions (massive stars being born very close to each other, falling into gravitational entanglement, keep merging and gravitationally attracting more of their massive neighbors) have created a hundred-solar-mass black hole. The Trapezium stars move quite fast, so this would explain their motion.

It would also put a black hole about 1500 light-years from us, the closest one known.

(via APOD: 2012 September 30 - A Galaxy Collision in NGC 6745)
Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration Acknowledgment: Roger Lynds (KPNO/NOAO) et al.
So, it would seem that Hubble snagged a shot of galactic collision aftermath. Here we see NGC 6745, who has just interacted with a smaller galaxy off the image to the lower right. In fact, you can see a tail of dust being pulled off in that direction.
It is likely that NGC 6745 used to be a regular spiral galaxy, but has been warped by this encounter.
Interestingly, stars are generally far enough apart that even when a whole galaxy collides with another, stars very rarely run into each other. However… the gas and dust in the interstellar medium, the magnetic fields being generated all over the place, even the dark matter, all of these things do interact, and sometimes “collide” in interesting ways.
Generally when dust and gas clouds collide, they end up compressing each other, and the gravitational tidal effects will create some interesting  pressure patters too. So, you end up with a burst of star formation in various places. You can see the bright spots of sudden and intense star formation in the “tail” of gas and dust being pulled along in the lower right.
Neat!

(via APOD: 2012 September 30 - A Galaxy Collision in NGC 6745)

Image Credit: NASAESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration 
Acknowledgment: Roger Lynds (KPNO/NOAOet al.

So, it would seem that Hubble snagged a shot of galactic collision aftermath. Here we see NGC 6745, who has just interacted with a smaller galaxy off the image to the lower right. In fact, you can see a tail of dust being pulled off in that direction.

It is likely that NGC 6745 used to be a regular spiral galaxy, but has been warped by this encounter.

Interestingly, stars are generally far enough apart that even when a whole galaxy collides with another, stars very rarely run into each other. However… the gas and dust in the interstellar medium, the magnetic fields being generated all over the place, even the dark matter, all of these things do interact, and sometimes “collide” in interesting ways.

Generally when dust and gas clouds collide, they end up compressing each other, and the gravitational tidal effects will create some interesting  pressure patters too. So, you end up with a burst of star formation in various places. You can see the bright spots of sudden and intense star formation in the “tail” of gas and dust being pulled along in the lower right.

Neat!

nearfuturedesign

nearfuturedesign:

Galaxy Spiral Rose (NGC 1073)

This unique origami spiral rose has been created from a picture of NGC 1073, a barred spiral galaxy, as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope.

Show off your love of space and the stars!

The rose has been protected and hardened with glaze (water-resistant, but not water-proof, it is paper after all) and decorated with black glitter to make it really shine.

With a pin-back setting, this piece can be a brooch, a pin, or a fascinator for hat or headband.


Have any questions? Contact the shop owner.

Yay! It’s up! I made this!