(via APOD: 2011 November 7 - Star Forming Region S106)
And now a butterfly nebula for you.
Interestingly, this one is a combination emission and reflection nebula.
The massive young star at the center of the nebula is blowing intense stellar winds out into the surrounding gas, ionizing it, and when it de-ionizes, it releases visible radiation. The dust surrounding this star forming region (the gas and dust are why it can even be a star forming region) further away from IRS 4 (the star) is reflecting the starlight, adding another layer to the image.
Apparently, there are also hundreds of brown dwarfs in in the gas. I’d assume some infrared astronomy, in addition to visual spectra analysis, would help you determine that.
Image Credit: GRANTECAN and IAC

(via APOD: 2011 November 7 - Star Forming Region S106)

And now a butterfly nebula for you.

Interestingly, this one is a combination emission and reflection nebula.

The massive young star at the center of the nebula is blowing intense stellar winds out into the surrounding gas, ionizing it, and when it de-ionizes, it releases visible radiation. The dust surrounding this star forming region (the gas and dust are why it can even be a star forming region) further away from IRS 4 (the star) is reflecting the starlight, adding another layer to the image.

Apparently, there are also hundreds of brown dwarfs in in the gas. I’d assume some infrared astronomy, in addition to visual spectra analysis, would help you determine that.

Image Credit: GRANTECAN and IAC