(via BiblioVault - Binding Violence: Literary Visions of Political Origins)
Oooh, interesting:

Binding Violence exposes the relation between literary imagination, autonomous politics, and violence through the close analysis of literary texts—in particular Sophocles’ Antigone, D. A. F. de Sade’s 120 Days of Sodom, and Vargas Llosa’s The Feast of the Goat—that speak to a blind spot in democratic theory, namely, how we decide democratically on the borders of our political communities. These works bear the imprint of the anxieties of democracy concerning its other—violence—especially when the question of a redefinition of membership is at stake.The book shares the philosophical interest in rethinking politics that has recently surfaced at the crossroads of literary criticism, philosophy, critical theory, and psychoanalysis. Fradinger takes seriously the responsibility to think through and give names to the political uses of violence and to provoke useful reflection on the problem of violence as it relates to politics and on literature as it relates to its times.

(via BiblioVault - Binding Violence: Literary Visions of Political Origins)

Oooh, interesting:

Binding Violence exposes the relation between literary imagination, autonomous politics, and violence through the close analysis of literary texts—in particular Sophocles’ Antigone, D. A. F. de Sade’s 120 Days of Sodom, and Vargas Llosa’s The Feast of the Goat—that speak to a blind spot in democratic theory, namely, how we decide democratically on the borders of our political communities. These works bear the imprint of the anxieties of democracy concerning its other—violence—especially when the question of a redefinition of membership is at stake.

The book shares the philosophical interest in rethinking politics that has recently surfaced at the crossroads of literary criticism, philosophy, critical theory, and psychoanalysis. Fradinger takes seriously the responsibility to think through and give names to the political uses of violence and to provoke useful reflection on the problem of violence as it relates to politics and on literature as it relates to its times.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Introduction

1 ‘The Disorder of Women’: Women, Love, and the Sense of Justice

2 The Fraternal Social Contract

3 Justifying Political Obligation

4 Women and Consent

5 Sublimation and Reification: Locke, Wolin and the Liberal-Democratic Conception of the Political

6 Feminist Critiques of the Public/Private Dichotomy

7 The Civic Culture: A Philosophic Critique

8 The Patriarchal Welfare State

9 Feminism and Democracy

Index

(via BiblioVault - Mapping Benjamin: The Work of Art in the Digital Age)
Waaaaaaaaaaaant.

Since its publication in 1936, Walter Benjamin’s  “Artwork” essay has become a canonical text about the status and place  of the fine arts in modern mass culture.  Benjamin was especially  concerned with the ability of new technologies—notably film, sound  recording, and photography—to reproduce works of art in great number.   Benjamin could not have foreseen the explosion of imagery and media that  has occurred during the past fifty years.  Does Benjamin’s  famous essay still speak to this new situation?  That is the question  posed by the editors of this book to a wide range of leading scholars  and thinkers across a spectrum of disciplines in the humanities.  The  essays gathered here do not hazard a univocal reply to that question;  rather they offer a rich, wide-ranging critique of Benjamin’s position  that refracts and reflects contemporary thinking about the ethical,  political, and aesthetic implications of life in the digital age.

(via BiblioVault - Mapping Benjamin: The Work of Art in the Digital Age)

Waaaaaaaaaaaant.

Since its publication in 1936, Walter Benjamin’s “Artwork” essay has become a canonical text about the status and place of the fine arts in modern mass culture. Benjamin was especially concerned with the ability of new technologies—notably film, sound recording, and photography—to reproduce works of art in great number. Benjamin could not have foreseen the explosion of imagery and media that has occurred during the past fifty years.

Does Benjamin’s famous essay still speak to this new situation? That is the question posed by the editors of this book to a wide range of leading scholars and thinkers across a spectrum of disciplines in the humanities. The essays gathered here do not hazard a univocal reply to that question; rather they offer a rich, wide-ranging critique of Benjamin’s position that refracts and reflects contemporary thinking about the ethical, political, and aesthetic implications of life in the digital age.

(via BiblioVault - The Commodity Culture of Victorian England: Advertising and Spectacle, 1851-1914)
Table of Contents Introduction1. The Great Exhibition of Things2. The Image of Victoria in the Year of Jubilee3. Selling Darkest Africa4. The Patent Medicine System5. Those Lovely Seaside Girls Conclusion Notes Index

Looks very interesting, no?

(via BiblioVault - The Commodity Culture of Victorian England: Advertising and Spectacle, 1851-1914)

Table of Contents

Introduction

1. The Great Exhibition of Things

2. The Image of Victoria in the Year of Jubilee

3. Selling Darkest Africa

4. The Patent Medicine System

5. Those Lovely Seaside Girls

Conclusion

Notes

Index

Looks very interesting, no?