(via Doctoring the Novel: Medicine and Quackery from Shelley to Doyle - Ohio University Press & Swallow Press)
Description:

If nineteenth-century Britain witnessed the rise of medical  professionalism, it also witnessed rampant quackery. It is tempting to  categorize historical practices as either orthodox or quack, but what  did these terms really signify in medical and public circles at the  time? How did they develop and evolve? What do they tell us about actual  medical practices? Doctoring the Novel explores the ways in which language  constructs and stabilizes these slippery terms by examining medical  quackery and orthodoxy in works such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Charles Dickens’s Bleak House and Little Dorrit, Charlotte Brontë’s Villette, Wilkie Collins’s Armadale, and Arthur Conan Doyle’s Stark Munro Letters.  Contextualized in both medical and popular publishing, literary  analysis reveals that even supposedly medico-scientific concepts such as  orthodoxy and quackery evolve not in elite laboratories and bourgeois  medical societies but in the rough-and-tumble of the public sphere, a  view that acknowledges the considerable, and often underrated, influence  of language on medical practices.

About the author:


Trained in Victorian studies and pharmacy, Sylvia A. Pamboukian is an associate professor in the department of English at Robert Morris  University. She has published on topics as diverse as Victorian x-rays,  Rudyard Kipling’s supernatural stories, and taboo in the Harry Potter  series.

(via Doctoring the Novel: Medicine and Quackery from Shelley to Doyle - Ohio University Press & Swallow Press)

Description:

If nineteenth-century Britain witnessed the rise of medical professionalism, it also witnessed rampant quackery. It is tempting to categorize historical practices as either orthodox or quack, but what did these terms really signify in medical and public circles at the time? How did they develop and evolve? What do they tell us about actual medical practices?

Doctoring the Novel explores the ways in which language constructs and stabilizes these slippery terms by examining medical quackery and orthodoxy in works such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Charles Dickens’s Bleak House and Little Dorrit, Charlotte Brontë’s Villette, Wilkie Collins’s Armadale, and Arthur Conan Doyle’s Stark Munro Letters. Contextualized in both medical and popular publishing, literary analysis reveals that even supposedly medico-scientific concepts such as orthodoxy and quackery evolve not in elite laboratories and bourgeois medical societies but in the rough-and-tumble of the public sphere, a view that acknowledges the considerable, and often underrated, influence of language on medical practices.

About the author:

Trained in Victorian studies and pharmacy, Sylvia A. Pamboukian is an associate professor in the department of English at Robert Morris University. She has published on topics as diverse as Victorian x-rays, Rudyard Kipling’s supernatural stories, and taboo in the Harry Potter series.

From 1988, but an interesting collection of material to work with:


Drawing on a wide range of sources—parliamentary debates, novels, medical lectures, feminist analyses of work, middle-class periodicals on demesticity—Poovey examines various controversies that provide glimpses of the ways in which representations of gender were simultaneously constructed, deployed, and contested. These include debates about the use of chloroform in childbirth, the first divorce law, the professional status of writers, the plight of governesses, and the nature of the nursing corps. Uneven Developments is a contribution to the feminist analysis of culture and ideology that challenges the isolation of literary texts from other kinds of writing and the isolation of women’s issues from economic and political histories.”

(via BiblioVault - Communication and Empire: Media, Markets, and Globalization, 1860–1930)
I’ve been trying to avoid over-sharing books. (Can you tell I’m going through some of our Duke UP books today?)
However, if I didn’t share this one, I think FS might kill me, loyal Minion though I am.
Description:
"Filling in a key chapter in communications history,  Dwayne R. Winseck and Robert M. Pike offer an in-depth examination of  the rise of the “global media” between 1860 and 1930. They analyze the  connections between the development of a global communication  infrastructure, the creation of national telegraph and wireless systems,  and news agencies and the content they provided. Conventional histories  suggest that the growth of global communications correlated with  imperial expansion: an increasing number of cables were laid as colonial  powers competed for control of resources. Winseck and Pike argue that  the role of the imperial contest, while significant, has been  exaggerated. They emphasize how much of the global media system was in  place before the high tide of imperialism in the early twentieth  century, and they point to other factors that drove the proliferation of  global media links, including economic booms and busts, initial steps  toward multilateralism and international law, and the formation of  corporate cartels.
Drawing on extensive research in corporate and  government archives, Winseck and Pike illuminate the actions of  companies and cartels during the late nineteenth century and early  twentieth, in many different parts of the globe, including Africa, Asia,  and Central and South America as well as Europe and North America. The  complex history they relate shows how cable companies exploited or  transcended national policies in the creation of the global cable  network, how private corporations and government agencies interacted,  and how individual reformers fought to eliminate cartels and harmonize  the regulation of world communications. In Communication and Empire,  the multinational conglomerates, regulations, and the politics of  imperialism and anti-imperialism as well as the cries for reform of the  late nineteenth century and early twentieth emerge as the obvious  forerunners of today’s global media.”

(via BiblioVault - Communication and Empire: Media, Markets, and Globalization, 1860–1930)

I’ve been trying to avoid over-sharing books. (Can you tell I’m going through some of our Duke UP books today?)

However, if I didn’t share this one, I think FS might kill me, loyal Minion though I am.

Description:

"Filling in a key chapter in communications history, Dwayne R. Winseck and Robert M. Pike offer an in-depth examination of the rise of the “global media” between 1860 and 1930. They analyze the connections between the development of a global communication infrastructure, the creation of national telegraph and wireless systems, and news agencies and the content they provided. Conventional histories suggest that the growth of global communications correlated with imperial expansion: an increasing number of cables were laid as colonial powers competed for control of resources. Winseck and Pike argue that the role of the imperial contest, while significant, has been exaggerated. They emphasize how much of the global media system was in place before the high tide of imperialism in the early twentieth century, and they point to other factors that drove the proliferation of global media links, including economic booms and busts, initial steps toward multilateralism and international law, and the formation of corporate cartels.

Drawing on extensive research in corporate and government archives, Winseck and Pike illuminate the actions of companies and cartels during the late nineteenth century and early twentieth, in many different parts of the globe, including Africa, Asia, and Central and South America as well as Europe and North America. The complex history they relate shows how cable companies exploited or transcended national policies in the creation of the global cable network, how private corporations and government agencies interacted, and how individual reformers fought to eliminate cartels and harmonize the regulation of world communications. In Communication and Empire, the multinational conglomerates, regulations, and the politics of imperialism and anti-imperialism as well as the cries for reform of the late nineteenth century and early twentieth emerge as the obvious forerunners of today’s global media.”