(via Grace Hopper - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
Dammit! How is it that playing around with CodeAcademy (have you tried it yet? you should.) is the only way I’ve heard about Grace Hopper?!? And I fancy myself a computer person and particularly interested in women in computer history, and yet here’s the popularizer of the term “debug” - because she literally removed a moth from a relay in the computer - and the inventor of COBOL and standardized programming for COBOL and FORTRAN…and I didn’t know a thing about her.
“In 1952 she had an operational compiler. “Nobody believed that,” she said. “I had a running compiler and nobody would touch it. They told me computers could only do arithmetic.”[15]”
A compiler. On UNIVAC. That no one said was possible.
Here’s the moth she debugged, by the by:

I salute you Rear Admiral “Amazing Grace” Murray Hopper!

(via Grace Hopper - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Dammit! How is it that playing around with CodeAcademy (have you tried it yet? you should.) is the only way I’ve heard about Grace Hopper?!? And I fancy myself a computer person and particularly interested in women in computer history, and yet here’s the popularizer of the term “debug” - because she literally removed a moth from a relay in the computer - and the inventor of COBOL and standardized programming for COBOL and FORTRAN…and I didn’t know a thing about her.

In 1952 she had an operational compiler. “Nobody believed that,” she said. “I had a running compiler and nobody would touch it. They told me computers could only do arithmetic.”[15]

A compiler. On UNIVAC. That no one said was possible.

Here’s the moth she debugged, by the by:

I salute you Rear Admiral “Amazing Grace” Murray Hopper!

queerkier

redvioletsquares:

I will never understand why Microsoft Excel goes to ‘IV’ instead of ‘ZZ’

Do you really want to know? Because I can tell you.

IV = I in the 26s place, and V in the 1s place = (9 x 26) + (22 x 1) = 234 + 22 = 256.

That is to say that “IV” is the way of writing base-26 for 256 (base-10)

You’ll note that 256 = 2^8 = 1 byte’s (8 binary bits are one byte, an important basic block-size of data for computers) worth of columns in a single sheet.

You’ll note that classic Excel stops at 65,536 rows per sheet as well. 65536 = 2^16 = 2 bytes’s worth of rows.

You probably didn’t actually want to know that, did you?

But it’s fun! Binary counting, bits/bytes and computer registers, it’s all fun. Right? Right?

bobrossta
fishingboatproceeds:

edwardspoonhands:

fishingboatproceeds:

THIS IS FOR EVERYONE.

We cannot forget that a generation of hackers created something that they gave away to the world for free for everyone to use and we took that and spawned marvelous new art, economies, and communities. 
TimBL could have patented the web browser, he could have licensed the web, he could be one of the richest men in the world. But instead, he thought maybe everyone should have equal and free access to it. Imagine how different the world would be if it weren’t for that decision. 
I teared up a bit when they honored him in London yesterday. 

Exactly.

JSYK, Tim Berners-Lee invented the protocol that the web runs on, HTTP (HyperText Transfer Protocol). HTML, the language used to render web pages, was born of SGML, an older, more general language (Simple General Markup Language), also developed by Tim. And while Tim did write a NeXT-based graphical web-browser called “WorldWideWeb”, later renamed “Nexus” to avoid confusion between the corner of the internet and the software used to access it, most of what we focus on as “browsers” and “the web” came from other places.
Mosaic was born at UIUC, birthed Netscape/Mozilla, and is credited with the popularization of the web. A lot of later developments of web-based technology came from companies like Netscape or open-source projects like Apache.
Now, the nice thing about Tim’s story is not just that he never tried to patent the crap out of this (he specifically developed a lot of the web to get around ludicrous licensing issues in one of the inspirations for the web, Dynatext SGML), but that he then formed the W3C to help foster the openness and further development of the web.
Personally, I think the work he’s done with the W3C probably says more about him than the fact that he just didn’t try to patent the web…but that’s just me.

fishingboatproceeds:

edwardspoonhands:

fishingboatproceeds:

THIS IS FOR EVERYONE.

We cannot forget that a generation of hackers created something that they gave away to the world for free for everyone to use and we took that and spawned marvelous new art, economies, and communities. 

TimBL could have patented the web browser, he could have licensed the web, he could be one of the richest men in the world. But instead, he thought maybe everyone should have equal and free access to it. Imagine how different the world would be if it weren’t for that decision. 

I teared up a bit when they honored him in London yesterday. 

Exactly.

JSYK, Tim Berners-Lee invented the protocol that the web runs on, HTTP (HyperText Transfer Protocol). HTML, the language used to render web pages, was born of SGML, an older, more general language (Simple General Markup Language), also developed by Tim. And while Tim did write a NeXT-based graphical web-browser called “WorldWideWeb”, later renamed “Nexus” to avoid confusion between the corner of the internet and the software used to access it, most of what we focus on as “browsers” and “the web” came from other places.

Mosaic was born at UIUC, birthed Netscape/Mozilla, and is credited with the popularization of the web. A lot of later developments of web-based technology came from companies like Netscape or open-source projects like Apache.

Now, the nice thing about Tim’s story is not just that he never tried to patent the crap out of this (he specifically developed a lot of the web to get around ludicrous licensing issues in one of the inspirations for the web, Dynatext SGML), but that he then formed the W3C to help foster the openness and further development of the web.

Personally, I think the work he’s done with the W3C probably says more about him than the fact that he just didn’t try to patent the web…but that’s just me.

Rendering Synthetic Objects into Legacy Photographs from Kevin Karsch on Vimeo.

(via Kevin Karsch’s Homepage)

O.o

Holy mother of a deity!

A team of researchers from UIUC is presenting this at SIGGRAPH Asia 2011, and it’s just mindblowing.

They’re rendering objects into already existing photos and doing it realistically by teaching the computer what’s in the photo, and letting it calculate light and color effects based on the spatial features of the photo. It’s simply amazing. Just watch.