(via BiblioVault - Mutants and Mystics: Science Fiction, Superhero Comics, and the Paranormal)
Click through for the full description and a link to get your own copy.
I just finished reading this (got it for free as part of my Christmas bonus this year) and I have to recommend it very highly. Please be forewarned, though, that this is a piece of scholarly analysis by a historian of religion who was trained here at the U of C Divinity School under Wendy Doniger. It will offer no easy reading, and may presume a certain level of scholarship and understanding on your part of gnosticism, esotericism, and mysticism.
Tracing what he calls the “Super Story” of comic book mythos through the lived experiences of authors’ own paranormal experiences and their expressions in comic books throughout their history, Kripal brings his own extensive experience, both scholarly and personal, of the mystical and paranormal to bear upon the interpretation of texts and contexts. The major meta-themes he explores are laid out in a particularly good progression to take the reader through the thought process that led to writing of this book. It actually turns out to become, in and of itself, a particularly good example of how Kripal sees the texts he analyses functioning in relation to their authors and their readers.

(via BiblioVault - Mutants and Mystics: Science Fiction, Superhero Comics, and the Paranormal)

Click through for the full description and a link to get your own copy.

I just finished reading this (got it for free as part of my Christmas bonus this year) and I have to recommend it very highly. Please be forewarned, though, that this is a piece of scholarly analysis by a historian of religion who was trained here at the U of C Divinity School under Wendy Doniger. It will offer no easy reading, and may presume a certain level of scholarship and understanding on your part of gnosticism, esotericism, and mysticism.

Tracing what he calls the “Super Story” of comic book mythos through the lived experiences of authors’ own paranormal experiences and their expressions in comic books throughout their history, Kripal brings his own extensive experience, both scholarly and personal, of the mystical and paranormal to bear upon the interpretation of texts and contexts. The major meta-themes he explores are laid out in a particularly good progression to take the reader through the thought process that led to writing of this book. It actually turns out to become, in and of itself, a particularly good example of how Kripal sees the texts he analyses functioning in relation to their authors and their readers.