(via BiblioVault - And Bid Him Sing: A Biography of Countée Cullen)
"Your grief and mine /
Must intertwine”
- “Any Human Being to Another” by Countée Cullen
Book Description:

While competing with Langston Hughes for the title of “Poet Laureate of Harlem,” Countée Cullen (1903–46) crafted poems that became touchstones for American readers, both black and white. Inspired by classic themes and working within traditional forms, Cullen shaped his poetry to address universal questions like love, death, longing, and loss while also dealing with the issues of race and idealism that permeated the national conversation. Drawing on the poet’s unpublished correspondence with contemporaries and friends like Hughes, Claude McKay, Carl Van Vechten, Dorothy West, Charles S. Johnson and Alain Locke, and presenting a unique interpretation of his poetic gifts, And Bid Him Sing is the first full-length critical biography of this famous American writer.
 
Despite his untimely death at the age of forty-two, Cullen left behind an extensive body of work. In addition to five books of poetry, he authored two much-loved children’s books and translated Euripides’ Medea, the first translation by an African American of a Greek tragedy. In these pages, Charles Molesworth explores the many ways that race, religion, and Cullen’s sexuality informed the work of one of the unquestioned stars of the Harlem Renaissance.
 
An authoritative work of biography that brings to life one of the chief voices of his generation, And Bid Him Sing returns to us one of America’s finest lyric poets in all of his complexity and musicality.

(via BiblioVault - And Bid Him Sing: A Biography of Countée Cullen)

"Your grief and mine /

Must intertwine”

- “Any Human Being to Another” by Countée Cullen

Book Description:

While competing with Langston Hughes for the title of “Poet Laureate of Harlem,” Countée Cullen (1903–46) crafted poems that became touchstones for American readers, both black and white. Inspired by classic themes and working within traditional forms, Cullen shaped his poetry to address universal questions like love, death, longing, and loss while also dealing with the issues of race and idealism that permeated the national conversation. Drawing on the poet’s unpublished correspondence with contemporaries and friends like Hughes, Claude McKay, Carl Van Vechten, Dorothy West, Charles S. Johnson and Alain Locke, and presenting a unique interpretation of his poetic gifts, And Bid Him Sing is the first full-length critical biography of this famous American writer.
 
Despite his untimely death at the age of forty-two, Cullen left behind an extensive body of work. In addition to five books of poetry, he authored two much-loved children’s books and translated Euripides’ Medea, the first translation by an African American of a Greek tragedy. In these pages, Charles Molesworth explores the many ways that race, religion, and Cullen’s sexuality informed the work of one of the unquestioned stars of the Harlem Renaissance.
 
An authoritative work of biography that brings to life one of the chief voices of his generation, And Bid Him Sing returns to us one of America’s finest lyric poets in all of his complexity and musicality.
(via BiblioVault - African American Writers and Classical Tradition)
Just from reading the small bits on the paperback correction pages I’m dropping in right now, I want to read this book so much!
Tracing the interaction between African American writers and the literatures of ancient Greece and Rome, from the time of slavery and its aftermath to the civil rights era and on into the present, the authors offer a sustained and lively discussion of the life and work of Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Ralph Ellison, and Rita Dove, among other highly acclaimed poets, novelists, and scholars. Assembling this brilliant and diverse group of African American writers at a moment when our understanding of classical literature is ripe for change, the authors paint an unforgettable portrait of our own reception of “classic” writing, especially as it was inflected by American racial politics.

(via BiblioVault - African American Writers and Classical Tradition)

Just from reading the small bits on the paperback correction pages I’m dropping in right now, I want to read this book so much!

Tracing the interaction between African American writers and the literatures of ancient Greece and Rome, from the time of slavery and its aftermath to the civil rights era and on into the present, the authors offer a sustained and lively discussion of the life and work of Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Ralph Ellison, and Rita Dove, among other highly acclaimed poets, novelists, and scholars. Assembling this brilliant and diverse group of African American writers at a moment when our understanding of classical literature is ripe for change, the authors paint an unforgettable portrait of our own reception of “classic” writing, especially as it was inflected by American racial politics.
emeraldincandescent

The problem that needs to be fixed is not kick all the girls out of YA, it’s teach boys that stories featuring female protagonists or written by female authors also apply to them. Boys fall in love. Boys want to be important. Boys have hopes and fears and dreams and ambitions. What boys also have is a sexist society in which they are belittled for “liking girl stuff.” Male is neutral, female is specific.

I heard someone mention that Sarah Rees Brennan’s THE DEMON’S LEXICON would be great for boys, but they’d never read it with that cover. Friends, then the problem is NOT with the book. It’s with the society that’s raising that boy. It’s with the community who inculcated that boy with the idea that he can’t read a book with an attractive guy on the cover.

Here’s how we solve the OMG SO MANY GIRLS IN YA problem: quit treating women like secondary appendages. Quit treating women’s art like it’s a niche, novelty creation only for girls. Quit teaching boys to fear the feminine, quit insisting that it’s a hardship for men to have to relate to anything that doesn’t specifically cater to them.

Because if I can watch Raiders of the Lost Ark and want to grow up to be an archaeologist, there’s no reason at all that a boy shouldn’t be able to read THE DEMON’S LEXICON with its cover on. My friends, sexism doesn’t just hurt women, and our young men’s abysmal rate of attraction to literacy is the proof of it.

If you want to fix the male literary crisis, here’s your solution:

Become a feminist.

The Problem is Not the Books by Saundra Mitchell (via becketted)

This is why, when I get into a classroom, we are reading Jane Austen, and the Brontes, and Sandra Cisneros, and Toni Morrison, and we are going to talk about exactly how these stories are relatable to everyone

(via BiblioVault - Binding Violence: Literary Visions of Political Origins)
Oooh, interesting:

Binding Violence exposes the relation between literary imagination, autonomous politics, and violence through the close analysis of literary texts—in particular Sophocles’ Antigone, D. A. F. de Sade’s 120 Days of Sodom, and Vargas Llosa’s The Feast of the Goat—that speak to a blind spot in democratic theory, namely, how we decide democratically on the borders of our political communities. These works bear the imprint of the anxieties of democracy concerning its other—violence—especially when the question of a redefinition of membership is at stake.The book shares the philosophical interest in rethinking politics that has recently surfaced at the crossroads of literary criticism, philosophy, critical theory, and psychoanalysis. Fradinger takes seriously the responsibility to think through and give names to the political uses of violence and to provoke useful reflection on the problem of violence as it relates to politics and on literature as it relates to its times.

(via BiblioVault - Binding Violence: Literary Visions of Political Origins)

Oooh, interesting:

Binding Violence exposes the relation between literary imagination, autonomous politics, and violence through the close analysis of literary texts—in particular Sophocles’ Antigone, D. A. F. de Sade’s 120 Days of Sodom, and Vargas Llosa’s The Feast of the Goat—that speak to a blind spot in democratic theory, namely, how we decide democratically on the borders of our political communities. These works bear the imprint of the anxieties of democracy concerning its other—violence—especially when the question of a redefinition of membership is at stake.

The book shares the philosophical interest in rethinking politics that has recently surfaced at the crossroads of literary criticism, philosophy, critical theory, and psychoanalysis. Fradinger takes seriously the responsibility to think through and give names to the political uses of violence and to provoke useful reflection on the problem of violence as it relates to politics and on literature as it relates to its times.

anglicalia
I am a dreamer. I know so little of real life that I just can’t help re-living such moments as these in my dreams, for such moments are something I have very rarely experienced. I am going to dream about you the whole night, the whole week, the whole year.
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (via dailystendhalnitesaudade) the novella White Nights. Named, in case you didn’t know, for the “white nights” of Petersburg in the summer time when the sun does not set fully enough for it to actually get dark (yes, Petersburg is that far north). There is a long tradition of Romanticism in Russian literature related to the white nights, a Dostoevsky effectively bridged the tradition into modernist literature with this piece. It’s quite good, and I recommend reading it.
(via It’s Alive! | Bad Astronomy | Discover Magazine)
This is awesome, and it’s actually the second book of science for kids that James Dunbar has written. It’s Alive! is all about the physics and chemistry of biology. How life happens in the primordial earth.
You can read a small, low-res version online. You can buy an ebook version for $5, or you can buy a print edition. It’s available for free to educators by emailing the author and is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share-a-Like license.
His first book is called Bang! It’s about the physics of the Big Bang and cosmology up to the formation of the Earth.
Phil’s write-up is here: http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2010/04/19/comic-bang/

There is a third book planned. I’m guessing about evolution, based on the progression so far.

(via It’s Alive! | Bad Astronomy | Discover Magazine)

This is awesome, and it’s actually the second book of science for kids that James Dunbar has written. It’s Alive! is all about the physics and chemistry of biology. How life happens in the primordial earth.

You can read a small, low-res version online. You can buy an ebook version for $5, or you can buy a print edition. It’s available for free to educators by emailing the author and is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share-a-Like license.

His first book is called Bang! It’s about the physics of the Big Bang and cosmology up to the formation of the Earth.

Phil’s write-up is here: http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2010/04/19/comic-bang/

There is a third book planned. I’m guessing about evolution, based on the progression so far.

Demons of the Night is a trove of haunting fiction—a gathering, for the first time in English, of the best nineteenth-century French fantastic tales. Featuring such authors as Balzac, Mérimée, Dumas, Verne, and Maupassant, this book offers readers familiar with the works of Edgar Allan Poe and E. T. A. Hoffman some of the most memorable stories in the genre. With its aura of the uncanny and the supernatural, the fantastic tale is a vehicle for exploring forbidden themes and the dark, irrational side of the human psyche.

Looks like it could be an interesting companion to any study of American and British literature of the same period.