(via Desktop Project Part 9: Again I see IC 342 | Bad Astronomy | Discover Magazine)
Spitzer may be “down” a bit (no coolant means it will not capture images as well), but it’s certainly not out.
IC 342 is bright and fairly close, but behind a lot of our own galaxy’s dust from our point of view, so it’s easier to see in infrared.
Above (and click through for the amazing full-size) is Spitzer’s IR take on IC 342.
Spitzer has a mirror twice the size of WISE’s, so it gets more detail than in this one:

(Credit: WISE)
Still, it’s always good to keep looking.
For comparison, if you have a serious amount of patience (as Phil’s friend in Anchorage did) and a good, dark night, you can capture a visible shot of IC 342:

(Credit: Travis Rector)

(via Desktop Project Part 9: Again I see IC 342 | Bad Astronomy | Discover Magazine)

Spitzer may be “down” a bit (no coolant means it will not capture images as well), but it’s certainly not out.

IC 342 is bright and fairly close, but behind a lot of our own galaxy’s dust from our point of view, so it’s easier to see in infrared.

Above (and click through for the amazing full-size) is Spitzer’s IR take on IC 342.

Spitzer has a mirror twice the size of WISE’s, so it gets more detail than in this one:

image

(Credit: WISE)

Still, it’s always good to keep looking.

For comparison, if you have a serious amount of patience (as Phil’s friend in Anchorage did) and a good, dark night, you can capture a visible shot of IC 342:

image

(Credit: Travis Rector)

(via APOD: 2012 March 25 - Barred Spiral Galaxy NGC 1300)
Holy something! NGC 1300 is 100,000 light-years across, and sits 70 million light-years away, but this amazing composite image from Hubble makes it seem much closer. (Seriously, you’ll want to click through to APOD, then click for the full-resolution version, or click here.)
Note that there are some interesting places where you can see through the stars and dust and catch other galaxies beyond. Also, note that while the Milky Way is a barred spiral too, this bar is much larger than ours, and we we have quite a few more spiral arms. (We look, actually, quite a bit like our closest galactic neighbor, the Andromeda Galaxy.)
Note that the spiral arm structure re-starts in the very center of the bar in NGC 1300! Also, you may have noticed that there’s not much of a bright bulge here, compared to other spirals you’ve seen pictures of. That’s because it doesn’t have a supermassive central black hole.
Image Credit: Hubble Heritage Team, ESA, NASA

(via APOD: 2012 March 25 - Barred Spiral Galaxy NGC 1300)

Holy something! NGC 1300 is 100,000 light-years across, and sits 70 million light-years away, but this amazing composite image from Hubble makes it seem much closer. (Seriously, you’ll want to click through to APOD, then click for the full-resolution version, or click here.)

Note that there are some interesting places where you can see through the stars and dust and catch other galaxies beyond. Also, note that while the Milky Way is a barred spiral too, this bar is much larger than ours, and we we have quite a few more spiral arms. (We look, actually, quite a bit like our closest galactic neighbor, the Andromeda Galaxy.)

Note that the spiral arm structure re-starts in the very center of the bar in NGC 1300! Also, you may have noticed that there’s not much of a bright bulge here, compared to other spirals you’ve seen pictures of. That’s because it doesn’t have a supermassive central black hole.

Image Credit: Hubble Heritage TeamESANASA

(via APOD: 2012 January 7 - Grand Spiral Galaxy NGC 1232)
NGC 1232 is an amazing grand spiral galaxy, and this shot from the VLT also shows a nice barred spiral off to the left. There’s a lot to see, open clusters of hot bright blue stars, dust lanes, dimmer main sequence stars, but there’s also a whole lot that we can’t see. Just plain can’t. In order to explain how fast the outer arms of the spiral move, there has to be twice the mass of what we can detect somewhere out past the edge of the galaxy, and interleaved through it. Dark matter dominates the motion of the galaxy.
Image Credit: FORS, 8.2-meter VLT Antu, ESO

(via APOD: 2012 January 7 - Grand Spiral Galaxy NGC 1232)

NGC 1232 is an amazing grand spiral galaxy, and this shot from the VLT also shows a nice barred spiral off to the left. There’s a lot to see, open clusters of hot bright blue stars, dust lanes, dimmer main sequence stars, but there’s also a whole lot that we can’t see. Just plain can’t. In order to explain how fast the outer arms of the spiral move, there has to be twice the mass of what we can detect somewhere out past the edge of the galaxy, and interleaved through it. Dark matter dominates the motion of the galaxy.

Image Credit: FORS8.2-meter VLT AntuESO

(via APOD: 2011 November 4 - Edge on NGC 3628)
One of the Leo Triplet of galaxies, who are all gravitationally interacting, NGC 3628 is a spiral like the Milky Way. The dust lanes in the galaxy have been pulled to fluffiness and there’s even a bit of a tidal tail going up and left from the edge of the galaxy. If you look closely, you can see the young blue star clusters and pink stellar nurseries the APOD editor mentions.
Image Credit & Copyright: Stephen Leshin

(via APOD: 2011 November 4 - Edge on NGC 3628)

One of the Leo Triplet of galaxies, who are all gravitationally interacting, NGC 3628 is a spiral like the Milky Way. The dust lanes in the galaxy have been pulled to fluffiness and there’s even a bit of a tidal tail going up and left from the edge of the galaxy. If you look closely, you can see the young blue star clusters and pink stellar nurseries the APOD editor mentions.

Image Credit & CopyrightStephen Leshin