(via APOD: 2012 May 26 - At the Edge of NGC 891)
NGC 891 is edge-on to us, as you can see in this Subaru/Hubble combination. This allows us to have a better view of the dust and gas blown away from the plane of the galaxy in filaments. This is likely from supernovas or star formation in the disk itself.
Credit: Composite Image Data - Subaru Telescope (NAOJ), Hubble Legacy Archive, Michael Joner, David Laney (West Mountain Observatory, BYU); Processing - Robert Gendler

(via APOD: 2012 May 26 - At the Edge of NGC 891)

NGC 891 is edge-on to us, as you can see in this Subaru/Hubble combination. This allows us to have a better view of the dust and gas blown away from the plane of the galaxy in filaments. This is likely from supernovas or star formation in the disk itself.

Credit: Composite Image Data - Subaru Telescope (NAOJ), Hubble Legacy Archive
Michael Joner, David Laney (West Mountain Observatory, BYU); Processing - Robert Gendler

(via APOD: 2012 January 9 - Facing NGC 6946)
First a meteor, then a star, now how about a galaxy. I can’t help it, the Fireworks Galaxy is awesome in this shot from the Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea. Why the “fireworks”?
Take a look at the colors here. Some of them are slightly over-emphasized, but they are realistic to an extent. The yellower area toward the galactic center is full of older main-sequence stars, the outer parts of the spirals show clear indicators of a whole lot of gas and dust, which means a lot of star formation. That also means that you can form a lot of short-lived stars (on a stellar time-scale, anyway) that tend to explode in a supernova. Per the APOD editor, nine supernovae have been observed in NGC 6946 since the beginning of the 20th century.
In the same vein, if you look at all the pink areas, those are places where dust is collapsing in to form new stars. New stars can get big and bright and oversized very easily.
Composite Image Data - Subaru Telescope (NAOJ) and Robert Gendler; Processing - Robert Gendler

(via APOD: 2012 January 9 - Facing NGC 6946)

First a meteor, then a star, now how about a galaxy. I can’t help it, the Fireworks Galaxy is awesome in this shot from the Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea. Why the “fireworks”?

Take a look at the colors here. Some of them are slightly over-emphasized, but they are realistic to an extent. The yellower area toward the galactic center is full of older main-sequence stars, the outer parts of the spirals show clear indicators of a whole lot of gas and dust, which means a lot of star formation. That also means that you can form a lot of short-lived stars (on a stellar time-scale, anyway) that tend to explode in a supernova. Per the APOD editor, nine supernovae have been observed in NGC 6946 since the beginning of the 20th century.

In the same vein, if you look at all the pink areas, those are places where dust is collapsing in to form new stars. New stars can get big and bright and oversized very easily.

Composite Image Data - Subaru Telescope (NAOJ) and Robert Gendler; Processing - Robert Gendler

(via APOD: 2011 October 9 - Nobels for a Strange Universe)
The above image from the High-Z project was taken with Hubble back in 1994 of SN 1994D (a nearby Type Ia supernova). This was one of the earliest observed Type Ia supernovae used by three different teams of scientists to propose evidence for dark energy.
Over the last thirteen years, all three projects have continued to study supernovae around the visible universe, trying to confirm the existence of lambda, the universal constant that exists in some cosmological models, notably Einstein’s.
The existence and a source for lambda, however, have been contentious in astronomical circles. It seems, though, that the universe really is expanding a lot faster than we can account for with what we can “see” across the various spectra. And the rate of expansion would be very well explained by dark energy, some kind of energy that is tied to the fabric of space itself but unaccounted for in our current models.
This year’s Nobel Prize in Physics went to the heads of the three teams who’ve been meticulously doing this work to get a better and better idea about dark energy, even if we can’t observe it directly for now.

(via APOD: 2011 October 9 - Nobels for a Strange Universe)

The above image from the High-Z project was taken with Hubble back in 1994 of SN 1994D (a nearby Type Ia supernova). This was one of the earliest observed Type Ia supernovae used by three different teams of scientists to propose evidence for dark energy.

Over the last thirteen years, all three projects have continued to study supernovae around the visible universe, trying to confirm the existence of lambda, the universal constant that exists in some cosmological models, notably Einstein’s.

The existence and a source for lambda, however, have been contentious in astronomical circles. It seems, though, that the universe really is expanding a lot faster than we can account for with what we can “see” across the various spectra. And the rate of expansion would be very well explained by dark energy, some kind of energy that is tied to the fabric of space itself but unaccounted for in our current models.

This year’s Nobel Prize in Physics went to the heads of the three teams who’ve been meticulously doing this work to get a better and better idea about dark energy, even if we can’t observe it directly for now.

(via APOD: 2011 October 6 - M82: Starburst Galaxy with a Superwind)
The remnants of a close encounter with another galaxy, M81, for the Cigar Galaxy are a burst of star formation and superwinds, the result of a whole lot of activity from supernovae to star-birth. The two are interrelated, as the gas and dust from supernovae are often blown about, and then compress to form proto-stars (see pictures of the Carnia Nebula or the Orion Nebula), and when those stars do form, they throw off stellar winds that furthe push gas and dust into lanes of material that then create new star-forming regions.
So much of that is going on in M82 that it’s throwing off a massive set of hydrogen filaments 10,000 light years off the galactic plane.
If you’re looking for M82, aim for the northern boundary of Ursa Minor…but you might want a fairly powerful ‘scope. (Like a university observatory.)

(via APOD: 2011 October 6 - M82: Starburst Galaxy with a Superwind)

The remnants of a close encounter with another galaxy, M81, for the Cigar Galaxy are a burst of star formation and superwinds, the result of a whole lot of activity from supernovae to star-birth. The two are interrelated, as the gas and dust from supernovae are often blown about, and then compress to form proto-stars (see pictures of the Carnia Nebula or the Orion Nebula), and when those stars do form, they throw off stellar winds that furthe push gas and dust into lanes of material that then create new star-forming regions.

So much of that is going on in M82 that it’s throwing off a massive set of hydrogen filaments 10,000 light years off the galactic plane.

If you’re looking for M82, aim for the northern boundary of Ursa Minor…but you might want a fairly powerful ‘scope. (Like a university observatory.)

Via symmetrybreaking, a Fermilab/SLAC joint publication

Three teams around the world have been tracking supernovae to see how their brightness compares with expectations, and while the are dim, as expected, they are too dim, an indicator that they’re moving away from us faster than expected.

The currently most popular supposed explanation is dark energy, which would act to push the expansion of the universe faster than we would expect.

Supernova SN 2011FE in M101 Narrowfield Color - Aug 26. Mag 13.9 and rising! by Joseph Brimacombe on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Details in image. Taken from New Mexico Skies. SN Mag 13.9 +/- 0.3 C. Total exposure time 110 min. FITS file available on request from jbrimaco@bigpond.net.au
Widefield image Aug 25: www.flickr.com/photos/43846774@N02/6079704081/
Narrowfield image Aug 25:  www.flickr.com/photos/43846774@N02/6079812340/in/photostream
New Mexico Skies www.newmexicoskies.com/
Latest Supernovae www.rochesterastronomy.org/supernova.html
A good shot where you can see M101 as a pinwheel, hence Pinwheel Galaxy, with PTF11kly highlighted (look for the little cross-hairs just below center).
This is from a 20” scope in New Mexico. Amazing.
HT Phil Plait’s Bad Astronomy Blog and the commentators thereupon who linked to it.

Supernova SN 2011FE in M101 Narrowfield Color - Aug 26. Mag 13.9 and rising! by Joseph Brimacombe on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Details in image. Taken from New Mexico Skies. SN Mag 13.9 +/- 0.3 C. Total exposure time 110 min. FITS file available on request from jbrimaco@bigpond.net.au
Widefield image Aug 25: www.flickr.com/photos/43846774@N02/6079704081/
Narrowfield image Aug 25: www.flickr.com/photos/43846774@N02/6079812340/in/photostream
New Mexico Skies www.newmexicoskies.com/
Latest Supernovae www.rochesterastronomy.org/supernova.html

A good shot where you can see M101 as a pinwheel, hence Pinwheel Galaxy, with PTF11kly highlighted (look for the little cross-hairs just below center).

This is from a 20” scope in New Mexico. Amazing.

HT Phil Plait’s Bad Astronomy Blog and the commentators thereupon who linked to it.

(via Chandra Press Room :: Nearby Supernova Factory Ramps Up :: 24 May 11)
“A local supernova factory has recently started production, according to a wealth of new data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory on the Carina Nebula. This discovery may help astronomers better understand how some of the Galaxy’s heaviest and youngest stars race through their lives and release newly-forged elements into their surroundings.”
Remember that everything you are made of came from a star.

(via Chandra Press Room :: Nearby Supernova Factory Ramps Up :: 24 May 11)

A local supernova factory has recently started production, according to a wealth of new data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory on the Carina Nebula. This discovery may help astronomers better understand how some of the Galaxy’s heaviest and youngest stars race through their lives and release newly-forged elements into their surroundings.”

Remember that everything you are made of came from a star.